Fur Harvesters Auction Results a positive sign

Scanning through the recent fur auction results from North Bay, it would appear that things may be on the rebuild for the Fur Industry.

 

As some of you may, or may not know the bottom had fallen out of the fur industry several years ago in many areas. Fisher, Otter, Beaver, Mink and other furs were hit hard by poor demand and bitterly low average prices.

 

According the January 9th Auction results, however, it would appear that the market is headed for a slight rebuild. The Beaver average is up to $18.30 for the eastern section, with encouraging 100% sold. Although not huge compared to $60 averages in the beaver hay days, it is still a far cry from an early season average of around $8.

 

Fisher and Otter are still seeing relatively low averages ($33.50 & $40 respectively) yet are a slight improvement over previous sale.

 

So, what does this mean to the layman on the street?

 

Well, the fur auction prices are, in my opinion, a good indicator of world climate and fur industry outlook. Prices reflect world demands for different Canadian fur, so when demand is down – for a multitude of reasons – Canadian trappers and the Fur Industry as a whole certainly feel the crunch.

 

According to Fur Harvesters of North Bay, January’s buying strength came from China and Greece, and they expect the market will continue to strengthen as most of Europe and Asia is experiencing very cold weather, combined with the growing Chinese economy which is also driving sales!

 

This is all positive news for the fur industry.

 

The next major auction offering of wild fur at Fur Harvesters is on February 19th, and I cross my fingers that prices and interest continues to see improvement!

 

Outdoorsguy

6 thoughts on “Fur Harvesters Auction Results a positive sign”

  1. Why do I trap you ask? It keeps me off the couch, in the bush and it makes me sleep good…..and to think some people used to do it for money.

    Thanks for the exposure Jeff.

    Anyone interested in Trapping there’s a workshop (open to the public) scheduled for Feb 6th 2010 in Cambray (Near Lindsay) Come out and learn what it’s all about. And if you’re a PETA member you’re more than welcome provided you can engage in some civil dialogue, otherwise please stay home where ever home is…

  2. Dear friend
    If you think these is a positive sign I don’t ever want to see a down slide.
    I have to go 93 miles with a sled to my cabin so I can trap; average -30 there is a lot of expenses and time. $51.00 average per marten does not nearly do it.

  3. Dear potlicker
    You are so right. The poeple in the fur business don’t have an idea how much passion and effort go’s in to trapping. If they think they do I would like to swap places, let them go and check traps at -43 with windshield. Like you said, 150km with a sled is a heck of a long way if you run into trouble. Just to people that hate trappers. If it wasn’t for the trappers the animals would get diseases. We make sure the population stays good.

    1. To trapper jack & potlicker, my point of this article was to show that prices are somewhat on the increase as apposed to 25 years ago when trappers could barely get $15 average for a blanket beaver. Trust me, I spent my fair share of time on the trapline over the years and understand the hours of hard-work involved.

      Between public opinion and the animal rights people over the years..we must take any small positives we can get in this industry; even if its only in the form of slight increase in demand at the fur market.

      Outdoorsguy

  4. To Jeff Morrison,in1980s to 1997 marten prices were $80.00 to $90.00 average.
    And gas prices were 35 cents a litre cost of living was a lot lower too.

    1. Potlicker & trapper jack, it really goes without saying that our best trapper days (and prices) are behind us. Thing is, if we don’t celebrate even the small victories now; like a surge in sagging prices in North Bay, all will be lost and ‘they’ will continue to win the battle!

      There are MANY MANY more people in Canada who oppose what we do than those actively involved in the fur trade, and the antis win yet another victory (& eventually the war) if we start battling amongst ourselves.

      Good luck and keep the faith!

      Outdoorsguy

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